This Song’s for the Birds

I like to write silly things.  Sometimes this leads me to write plays involving my coworkers.  Sometimes I create poems or make up stories about the people around me.  Occasionally my creativity extends to the musical world.  A masterful composer, I am not.  But the following song is about a bird.  Experienced birders will probably get the references in this song, but in case you’re unfamiliar with the Acadian Flycatcher, let me enlighten you.

The Acadian Flycatcher is a small little bird that that breeds in the eastern U.S. and spends the winter in South America.  Since I enjoy the outdoors and warm weather, I’m not a big fan of the cold.  Which leads me to wonder if I too should migrate when cold arrives.  Hold on, let me check the weather in Colombia.  Ninety degrees!?  Maybe I’ll settle for Texas.  Anyway, Acadian Flycatchers are usually found in deciduous forests and hunt flies and other insects in the air.  They have a hard time sitting still from my experience.  Usually when I’m watching an Acadian, he will either fly rapidly from tree to tree or he will make a quick takeoff from a tree branch and hover around an area before returning to his perch.  Maybe Acadians have ADHD, maybe they’re just excitable.  At any rate, they are very active birds.  During my time performing point counts in Indiana over the last two years, the most common bird I have recorded on a survey is the Acadian Flycatcher.  They are everywhere in southern Indiana and sometimes they hang out in bunches.  This makes it hard to narrow down their exact numbers at a point count station.  Their call sounds like a loud, high-pitched peet-seep!  Imagine being out in the woods at 6:00 in the morning.  You can barely see because the sun hasn’t risen yet.  Birds are singing and calling out.  Unfortunately, you keep getting distracted by the continual peet-seep of every Acadian in the area.  There are at least three of them, but it’s hard to get an exact count because they keep flying around and calling out.

An interesting thing about Acadians is that sometimes you can hear their wings whirr as they take off.  If you’re familiar with doves, you know that during takeoff their wings beat against the air, creating a whirring/whistling sound.  Acadians do the same thing, but on a lower scale.  Anyway, when I would hear an Acadian during a survey, I would record him at the first time interval I heard him.  There were 3 time intervals consisting of 3 minute and 20 seconds, for a total count time of 10 minutes.  If I heard a peet-seep in minute 3, then I would record an Acadian in the first interval and not mark him down again unless I heard him in a later interval.  The thing is, they NEVER LEAVE!  Okay, enough background.  Here’s a picture of an Acadian Flycatcher.

Acadian Flycatcher Photo

(Acadian Flycatcher – Cornell Lab of Ornithology)

Now on to my brief song, which contains only one verse.  Please don’t get angry at me.  The song is called ‘Acadian’ and can be sung to the tune of the popular pop song ‘Titanium’.  If you have never heard that song before, don’t expect me to write a blog about it.  Just listen to it online.  Hopefully this will make you smile.  May the birds be ever in your favor!

Acadian

Verse
I shout it out, and not a word you hear me say
I’m singing loud not saying much
I’m criticized but I will sing peet-seep each day
You write me down, and still I call

Chorus
No habitat, where I’m not found,
Fly away, fly away
Everywhere, you write me down,
Write away, write away
You mark me down but I won’t leave
I am Acadian
You mark me down but I won’t leave
I am Acadian

Bridge
Wing whirr, peet-seep
Singing till I make you weep
Wing whirr, I keep flying past

Chorus
You mark me down but I won’t leave
I am Acadian
You mark me down but I won’t leave
I am Acadian
You mark me down but I won’t leave
I am Acadian
You mark me down but I won’t leave
I am Acadian

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